What is the most appropriate type of fire extinguisher?

Class A extinguishers will serve you best if you keep them near a fireplace. Use a Class B extinguisher when the fire’s fuel source is a combustible gas or liquid such as gasoline, ethanol or propane. These flames can burn out quickly if the fuel source is removed, but they can also spread fast.

What are the 4 types of fire extinguishers?

There are four classes of fire extinguishers – A, B, C and D – and each class can put out a different type of fire. Multipurpose extinguishers can be used on different types of fires and will be labeled with more than one class, like A-B, B-C or A-B-C.

How do I choose a fire extinguisher?

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) provides minimum recommendations for the home: Primary Fire Extinguishers – For your main home protection, install a 2-A:10-B:C rated extinguisher on every level of your home – no more than 40 feet apart. Include all locations where a fire may start.

Is ABC fire extinguisher OK for kitchen?

For the kitchen it’s generally recommended to have a multi-purpose fire extinguisher, such as one for Class A-B-C fires, or one that can specifically handle Class B or K fires.

Should homes have fire extinguishers?

Yes, provided you know when and how to use it. Fire extinguishers can be a small but important part of the home fire safety plan. They can save lives and property by putting out a small fire or suppressing it until the fire department arrives. … Remember, lives are more important than property.

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What is ABC powder in fire extinguisher?

At USC, “ABC” fire extinguishers are filled with a fine yellow powder. The greatest portion of this powder is composed of monoammonium phosphate. Nitrogen is used to pressurize the extinguishers. ABC extinguishers are red and range in size from 5 lbs to 20 lbs on campus.

What is a Type D fire?

Class D fires only involving combustible metals – magnesium, sodium (spills and in depth), potassium, sodium-potassium alloys uranium, and powdered aluminum.

Fire safety