Where does the wood go when you burn it?

Wood is made of fiber (cellulose) and minerals (metals). When wood is burned, oxygen and other elements in the air (mainly carbon, hydrogen and oxygen) react to form carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere, while the minerals turn into ashes.

Does wood disappear when burned?

It is important to think of a fire as something the wood is doing, and not an object in its own right — it doesn’t really “disappear” or “go somewhere”, but rather the wood just stops making flames when the wood runs out of chemical energy.

Does fire actually touch the wood?

Typically, fire comes from a chemical reaction between oxygen in the atmosphere and some sort of fuel (wood or gasoline, for example). Of course, wood and gasoline don’t spontaneously catch on fire just because they’re surrounded by oxygen.

What happens when a wooden log is burned?

When you burn a log of wood, the carbon (mainly) and other atoms present in it are turned into oxides. For example, Carbon is turned into carbon dioxide and sulphur is turned into Sulphur dioxide and so on during the process of combustion. Here, the oxygen comes from the atmosphere.

Why do logs smoke?

Wood smoke comes primarily from the burning of certain chemicals that are part of the natural makeup of hardwoods like oak, hickory, and ash, and softwoods like pine, fir, and spruce, to name a few. When these chemicals are heated inefficiently they turn to smoke which is released into the air around your fire pit.

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What actually burns in wood?

Wood is made of fiber (cellulose) and minerals (metals). When wood is burned, oxygen and other elements in the air (mainly carbon, hydrogen and oxygen) react to form carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere, while the minerals turn into ashes. … Thus the carbon is left to turn into charcoal.

Why do logs burn?

At a crucial point, the gassy cloud around the log catches fire and begins to flame. … Every fire needs oxygen to burn. When the ash layer gets too thick, it’s hard for the oxygen to get through. Poking at a log helps, because it knocks away this ash barrier, letting fresh air onto the burning log’s surface.

What happens chemically when you burn wood?

When wood gets hot enough — such as when lightning hits or a log is tossed on an already burning fire — those bonds break. The process, called pyrolysis, releases atoms and energy. Unbound atoms form a hot gas, mingling with oxygen atoms in the air.

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