Can you use play sand in a fire pit?

Some metal fire pits recommend you to use an inch or 2 thick layer of sand at the bottom of the pit. … Sand is also great for protecting the actual metal bowl from the intense heat the fire can put out. At the end of the day, there is no harm in putting sand in the base of a metal pit.

What should you not put in a fire pit?

Avoid burning these dangerous items in your fire pit:

  • Treated wood. Lumber that’s designed for outdoor construction is often pressure treated or chemically preserved to prevent rotting in wet conditions. …
  • Trash. …
  • Paper and cardboard. …
  • Poison ivy, poison oak, and/or poison sumac. …
  • Lighter fluid or gasoline. …
  • Other items to avoid.

Why do I need sand in my fire pit?

A layer of sand is meant to protect the metal at the bottom of the bowl from the extreme heat of the fire. The sand absorbs the heat and distributes the heat throughout the entire base of the pit evenly. Without the sand, the heat can become concentrated in one specific area.

What is the best base for a fire pit?

Hard rocks like granite, marble, or slate are much denser, and therefore less likely to absorb water and explode when exposed to heat. Other rocks that are safe to use around and in your fire pit include fire-rate brick, lava glass, lava rocks, and poured concrete.

IMPORTANT:  What is a concern with using a Class K fire extinguisher?

Do you have to dig a hole for a fire pit?

Fire-pit depth really depends on what you want and how into your project you’re going to get. For instance, if you just want a basic fire pit, dig about 6 to 8 inches down and call it good. You can go deeper if you want, but keep in mind that you don’t want the hole so deep you can’t enjoy watching the fire.

Fire safety