What do the colors mean on the NFPA diamond?

The system uses a color-coded diamond with four quadrants in which numbers are used in the upper three quadrants to signal the degree of health hazard (blue), flammability hazard (red), and reactivity hazard (yellow). The bottom quadrant is used to indicate special hazards.

What do the four colors in the NFPA diamond mean?

The four bars are color coded, using the modern color bar symbols with blue indicating the level of health hazard, red for flammability, orange for a physical hazard, and white for Personal Protection. The number ratings range from 0-4. The Health section conveys the health hazards of the material.

What does the color white within a diamond mean?

People often notice a colored sign on a building called a fire diamond. Fire diamonds located on tanks and buildings indicate the level of chemical hazard located there. The four colors are blue, red, yellow, and white. … The white indicates special precautions, usually used for oxy, or oxidizing agent.

What does the white represent on the NFPA diamond?

The white diamond, appearing at the bottom of the label, conveys Special Hazard information. This information is conveyed by use of symbols that represent the special hazard. … To determine the NFPA Hazard Ratings for a material that does not have the label affixed, check the Material Safety Data Sheet.

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What are the 9 hazard symbols?

Hazard pictograms (symbols)

  • Explosive (Symbol: exploding bomb)
  • Flammable (Symbol: flame)
  • Oxidising (Symbol: flame over circle)
  • Corrosive (Symbol: corrosion)
  • Acute toxicity (Symbol: skull and crossbones)
  • Hazardous to the environment (Symbol: environment)

What does 4 represent in the NFPA 704 Diamond?

Number System: NFPA Rating and OSHA’s Classification System 0-4 0-least hazardous 4-most hazardous 1-4 1-most severe hazard 4-least severe hazard • The Hazard category numbers are NOT required to be on labels but are required on SDSs in Section 2. … Acute hazards are more typical for emergency response applications.

Fire safety